Géographie du Cachemire
CLIMBS IN SIACHEN AREA
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Ghent I -c7,401m-
Ghent II -c7,342m-
Abale -c6,360m-
Amale -c6,312m-
Argan Kangri -c6,789m-
Apsarasas group -c7,130/c7,245m-
Apsarasas Kangri I -c7,245m-
Apsarasas Kangri II -c7,239m-
Apsarasas Kangri III -c7,236m-
Apsarasas Kangri IV -c7,226m-
Apsarasas Kangri V -c7,181m-
Apsarasas Kangri VI -c7,184m-
Apsarasas Kangri VII -c7,000m-
Apsarasas Kangri, South West Peak -c7,117m-
Junction Peak -c6,352m- (c6,350m)
Mercury Peak -c7,195m-
Padmanabh (Terong Tower) -c7,030m-
Pyramid peak (Main S.) -c7,123m-
Pyramid peak (Thyor peak/Pathibara) -c7,058m-
Rimo group (Rimu group) -c7,233/c7,385m-
Rimo I (Rimu I) -c7,385m-
Rimo II (Rimu II) -c7,373m-
Rimo III (Rimu III) -c7,233m-
Rimo IV (Rimu IV) -c7,169m-

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Here joint maps of Siachen area and around :

Ghent I -c7,401m- :

Ghent is mysterious rarely attempt.
In 1961, austrian expedition led by E. Waschak made the first ascent of Ghent.
In 1980, a West German team led by B. Scherzer climbed Ghent I.

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Ghent II -7342m-.

In 1978: Japanese expedition led by H. Kobayashi climbed Ghent NE from the Kondus glacier.
In 1977: Austrian expedition climbed Ghent NE from the Kondus glacier.

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Abale -c6,360m-:

On a northerly side glacier christened Nono Glacier, Muni Schroff and Samgyal made the first ascent of a 6,360m peak they named Abale.

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Amale -c6,312m-:

Dam, Lingwal and Wangchuk made the first ascent of peak christened Amale (6,312m).

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Argan Kangri -c6,789m-:

Bonington, Lowther, Muni, and Shroff put their energies into the far more remote Argan Kangri (6,789m) but were unable to really get to grips with the mountain due to avalanche prone conditions.

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Apsarasas group -c7,130/c7,200m- :

"Apsara" (fairy) and "sas" (house), Apsarasas would be the house of the fairies. The origin of the word Apsarasas comes from Indian mythology: the seven Apsarasas, resulting from the churning of the milk sea, are girls of Kasyapa where they are partners of the centaurs, fairies wifes of gods like demons; their magic veil dissimulate them with the mortals.
The Apsarasas Group is on the the war indo-pakitanaise line and totally close to foreign visitors. This group made up of 7 distinct summits among one of the the most powerful and mysterious mountians in the world. It should be noted that several named secondary summits as Peak 7130, Peak 7140 are virgins.

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Apsarasas I -c7,245m-:

Th 7th august 1976, Japanese expedition led by H. Misawa made the first ascent of Apsarasas I, crossing over Bilafond (Saltoro pass).
In 1980, Indian Army expedition led by Brig K.N. Thandani climbed Apsarasas I.

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Apsarasas Kangri II -c7,239m- :

Maybe virgin.

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Apsarasas Kangri III -c7,236m- :

Maybe virgin.

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Apsarasas Kangri IV -c7,226m- :

Maybe virgin.

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Apsarasas Kangri V -c7,181m- :

[To complete]

Apsarasas Kangri VI -c7,184m- :

[To complete]

Apsarasas Kangri VII -c7,000m- :

[To complete]

Apsarasas Kangri, South West Peak -c7,117m- :

Climbed by a japanese expedition in 1976.

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Junction Peak -c6,352m (c6,350m)

The first ascent of this fine vantage point was made in 1912 by Fanny Bullock-Workman and her Italian guides.
In 2006, indians army made the third ascent.

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Mercury Peak -c7,195m- :

In 2002, unconfirmed reports suggest that an Indian Army expedition organized by the Corps of Engineers and led by Col Dinesh Kumar, made the first ascent of a subsidiary 7,195m summit referred to as Mercury. The report suggests this summit was reached on the 2nd October 2002.

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Padmanabh (Terong Tower) -c7,030m- :

Terong means "The close valley ", Terong is the "Close valley summit".
One of the major events of the season was the first ascent of 7,030m Padmanabh by a joint Indo-Japanese Expedition. This fine high summit in the Siachen Glacier region, was climbed during the first real exploration of the Teram Shehr Plateau. The Indians comprised Harish Kapadia (Leader), Motup Chewang, Lt Commander Satyabrata Dam, Huzefa Electricwala and Rushad Nanavatty. The Japanese participants were Hiroshi Sakai (Deputy & Climbing Leader), Tadashi Fukuwada, Ryuji Hayashibara, Dr Hirofumi Oe and Yasushi Tanahashi. A liaison officer from the Indian army, Captain Madhab Boro, accompanied the team.
The expedition left Leh on the 17th May. The unusually early start for the Karakoram was dictated by Kapadia's goal of first reaching the Karakoram Pass via the old winter trade route along the Shyok River, a route only practicable at low water from early November to May. Even so, it was not possible to follow the river past a point in the vicinity of Saser Branza, so instead the expedition joined the regularly used summer trail at Murgo, then followed this over the 5,415m Depsang Pass and through the Army post at DBO (Daulat Beg Oldi) to the historic 5,569m Karakoram Pass on the Chinese border. Few foreigners have reached this desolate col on the old silk road from Leh to Yarkand since the outbreak of the Indo-Chinese war in 1962. In fact the Japanese were the first from their country for 93 years. Dam, Huzefa and Kapadia had previously been there in August 2000 (see INFO 225) and at that time were only the third civilian party since '62 to be allowed to do so.
Retracing its steps part way from the pass, the expedition then headed west and after ferrying loads up the Central Rimo Glacier, finally crossed Col Italia (5,920m) to gain the upper Teram Shehr Glacier. In 1929 an Italian expedition led by Professor Dainelli visited the Siachen Glacier but was subsequently unable to reverse its approach from the south via the Nubra Valley, when the river was found to be in serious flood. Instead the team members were forced to re-ascend the Siachen and find an escape east from the top of the Teram Shehr Glacier. The high pass leading to the Central Rimo Glacier and crossed by Dainelli's team with almost 400 porters, was dubbed Col Italia. Although it had been reached once since, in August 2000 from the Central Rimo by members of Harish Kapadia's joint Indo-French Expedition, a complete crossing had never been repeated. After crossing the pass in June 2002, the Indo-Japanese team descended the far side and set up a camp at 5,650m east of Padmanabh.
South of their camp lay the great Teram Shehr Plateau, a 16km by 10km quasi-level icefield at around 6,000m surrounded by beautiful snowy peaks. Only one of these had previously been climbed. Bhujang (6,560m) on the western rim had seen an ascent from the Siachen Glacier in 1998 by Indians. Starting on the 21st June Hayashibara and Kapadia climbed south on to the upper reaches of the plateau, the first humans to do so, and made an exploration of various cols on the rim. In the meantime the rest of the party were making an attempt on the virgin Padmanabh.
Nearly all the 7,000m peaks surrounding the Siachen Glacier were climbed in the 1970s by primarily Japanese expeditions, entering the region from Pakistan-controlled territory to the west. Padmanabh, the highest peak on the western rim of the plateau north of Bhujang and named by the 1998 expedition, remained virgin. After setting up the 5,650m camp, the team had around two weeks to complete the climb before starting their descent to the Siachen and a pre-arranged meeting with 15 Ladhaki porters.
A second camp was quickly established at 6,250m on the col at the base of the elegant South South East Ridge, after which Dam, Nanavatty, Oe and Tanahashi fixed the first five pitches. On the 21st and 22nd June they were replaced by Chewang, Electricwala, Fukuwada, and Sakai, who pushed the route up to c6,750m, a point 16 rope lengths above the col. The average angle of the granite ridge was 45-50° but it contained small, complicated snow ridges often up to 70-80° in angle.
A little before 4am on the 25th, 12 days after beginning work on the climb, Dam, Sakai and Tanahashi set off from the col for a summit attempt. The weather was not settled and Dam found it hard to keep pace with the two fit Japanese, both of whom have, amongst other successes, summited Nanga Parbat. He turned back at around 6.30am. By 8.30am the Japanese were at the high point and then took a further seven hours to climb the next 300m. The wind was strong, the terrain steep and deep powder snow over verglassed granite made every pitch difficult. About 11 hours after leaving camp they reached a very difficult wall of snow, which proved to be the crux. Sakai led this near vertical pitch of deep unconsolidated sugar snow, eventually digging a trench two metres deep and finally tunnelling through a cornice. Tanahashi led the final (26th) pitch up the summit ridge and the two reached the top at 3.10pm. After a brief rest the descent of the top five pitches proved equally taxing and at one point the rappel rope jammed, forcing the Japanese to cut it. Finally the two regained the camp on the col at 8pm.
The following day Chewang, Fukuwada, Nanavatty and Oe left the 5,650m camp for the col and their own summit attempt. Unfortunately, the onset of a heavy snowstorm turned them back and with the mountain now out of condition for several days, the whole team decided to begin its descent of the Teram Shehr Glacier. Negotiating crevassed terrain, the climbers descended to the moraine, where the Ladakhi porters were waiting, then carried on down to the first Army Camp at 4,870m on the Siachen. On the 1st July they reached the snout of this glacier and the vehicles waiting to transport them back to Leh.
The Siachen Glacier has been a well-known battleground for Indian and Pakistan troops for the last 19 years and with recent infiltration of armed militants into Kashmir, the December 2001 attack on the Indian Parliament, the subsequent threat of all-out nuclear war and the May 2002 murders in Jammu, hopes for a solution have faded. The pollution in, and degradation of, this wonderful mountain environment is appalling. Virtually nothing can be burnt, destroyed or packed out and the remains of abandoned war material, garbage and human waste is both huge and extensive. All this will finally end up in the Nubra River and subsequently in the waters of the Indian Plains. There is also the human and financial cost of the war, the latter estimated at one million dollars a day for India alone.
One solution that could enable both armies to withdraw in conditions of honour and dignity would be to turn the whole region into at Transboundary Peace Park. It would save many lives, huge costs and a magnificent area that is of little real use to anyone except mountain visitors and climbers. There are currently around 170 Transboundary Parks in the world and it would be fitting if this number was joined by the Siachen Glacier region. However, at the time of writing talk of peace seems as remote as ever.

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Pyramid peak (Main S.) -7123m- :

Summit maybe in 1993.

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Pyramid peak (Thyor peak/Pathibara) -7058m- :

Summit maybe in 1949 by an expedition from switzerland.

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Rimo (Rimu) group -c7,233/c7,385m-:

Rimo means " stripes ", the group of Rimo is the group of the " striped " mountains.
Rimo is a mountain full of mysteries. A long time ago, Rimo remained in the heart of a icy desert. Travellers who travelled by the Karakoram pass toward Leh it perhaps saw it but it is only in 1914 that the Italian explorer Filippo de Filippi observed and photographed this mountain for the first time. Thereafter, Rimo fell into the lapse of memory during 15 years until the Terong valley is explored again by Philip Jenny Visser (Most of the peaks were first christened by Sahib Afraj, indian officer during Visser expedition in 1835.) . After the second world war, the war between India and Pakistan beginning, the area was closed and Rimo stay out the world during 49 years. In 1978, a small Japanese team left Pakistan, crossed Siachen to the Terong valley but could not cross the impetuous torrent of the same name. It was still necessary to wait until 1985 so that a team approached Rimo. The Indian army controlling thereafter all the Sachien glacier where indo-foreign expeditions were authorized.

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Rimo I (Rimu I) -c7,385m- :

1988 Rimo I, the first ascent was made by the Indo-Japanese team led by Hukam Singh and Yoshio Ogata. They approached from the Terong valley and Ibex Col. 1988 Apsarasas I was climbed by the Indian Army Team. Leader and details not known.

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Rimo II (Rimu II) -c7,373m- :

1989 : Rimo II first ascent, and Rimo IV second ascent. These peaks were climbed by an Indo-British team led by Sonam Palzor and Doug Scott (+ Kekus et Sustad). They approached from the Siachen snout and the Terong glacier.

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Rimo III (Rimu III) -c7,233m- :

1985 : an Indo-British expedition led by Harish Kapadia (with Dave Wilkinson), explored and climbed peaks in Terong group. They approached from the Siachen glacier, climbed Rimo III and attempted Rimo I.

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Rimo IV (Rimu IV)-c7,169m- :

Rimo IV (7,169m) first climbed in 1984 by Y Chhibar, G Sharma, K Sooch and M Yadev from an Indian Army expedition.
On the 23rd August 2001, Jean Francois Manificat and Pemba Tsering Sherpa made the third ascent of Rimo IV (7,169m) via the West Face from the amphitheatre between Rimos III and IV. The two summiteers were part of an Indo-French expedition led by Bombay mountaineer, Harish Kapadia. Starting in Leh at the end of July the team followed the old silk route north over the Saser La and on the 11th, Kapadia with Satyabrata Dam, Huzefa Electricwala, Raj Joshi, the Liaison Officer Rahul K Jain and Kaivan Mistry reached the 5,569m Karakoram Pass on the border with China, becoming only the third civilian party to do so since restrictions were imposed after the Indo-Chinese war of 1962. The whole team re-grouped on the 12th at Gapshan, where the Chip Chap flows into the Shyok and from there established two separate Base Camps; one on the right bank of the South Rimo Glacier and one at the start of the central moraine of the Central Rimo Glacier.
The South Rimo team, which included Dam, Joshi, and the four French (well-known photographer Olivier Follmi, Manificat, Bernard Odier and the expedition deputy leader Jean Francois Tripard), concentrated their efforts on a successful ascent of Rimo IV, first climbed in 1984 via the West Face by four members of an Indian Army expedition, which approached from the east up the South Rimo Glacier. It was climbed again in 1989 by three Indian members of an Indo-British Expedition, who approached from the North Terong Valley via a high col between Rimos II and III. Last year's ascent of Rimo IV is thought to have more or less taken the 1989 line. In the days following the ascent Manificat, Odier and Tripard also made the first visits to two low-points on the rim of the glacier; Dzomsa Col (6,050m) and Lharimo Col (6,200m).
Meanwhile, the Indians were busy in the Central Rimo, a glacier that had only previously been visited twice. In 1913 an Italian expedition led by Filippi de Filippi mapped the area. In 1930 a second Italian team led by G Dainelli, which was climbing on the Siachen Glacier to the west, was forced to escape via a high pass from the head of the Teram Shehr Glacier on to the upper Central Rimo, when their anticipated exit via the Nubra River, which drains the Siachen, was found to be badly flooded. The 5,920m high pass has subsequently been referred to as Col Italia and was reached again for the first time in 70 years on the 23rd August 2000 by Electricwala, Kapadia and Mistry with two Sherpas, Karma and Pemba Tsering. This Indian team established four camps on the glacier before reaching the col, which was found to be a seven kilometre-square plateau. During their return down the glacier, Electricwala and Sherpas, Karma and Nima Dorje, climbed the previously virgin Migpa (5,935m) via the South East Ridge.
Tragically, as the Central Rimo team were returning on the 27th, an accident took place. While crossing a knee-deep tributary of the Shyok, Dan Singh, Electricwala, Kapadia and Mistry were swept off their feet. All except Mistry managed to get to different banks of the river and some had to wait for almost three cold hours before being rescued by the Sherpas. For Mistry, however, there was no such luck. Unable to throw off his heavy rucksack he was carried almost three kilometres downstream, where his body was found by the South Rimo climbers who were crossing the Shyok at the time. Thirty two years old Mistry was an enthusiastic mountaineer from Bombay and was making his ninth expedition to the Himalaya/Karakoram. A lighting engineer for the theatre world, he was very well-known in both climbing and art circles.
1989 : Rimo II first ascent, and Rimo IV second ascent. These peaks were climbed by an Indo-British team led by Sonam Palzor and Doug Scott. They approached from the Siachen snout and the Terong glacier (Rimo IV South face unclimbed).



To the same topics:
Himalaya du Cachemire
Hindu Raj : Description géographique
Hindu Kush : Description géographique
Cartes géographiques du Cachemire
Images satellites du Cachemire
 
Statistiques géographiques
Index géographique

Révision B - 23/02/08 (http://blankonthemap.free.fr)


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